Soci 2 quiz questions

Lane Kenworthy
Summer 2017

JOBS

Practice quiz question: Approximately what share of working-age (25 to 64) Americans is employed?

a. 35%
b. 55%
c. 75%
d. 95%

1. In “Human Work in the Robotic Future,” Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson say the jobs most likely jobs to be replaced by robots are

a. Low-paying ones
b. High-paying ones

2. In “Human Work in the Robotic Future,” McAfee and Brynjolfsson say policy makers should be focused on

a. How to deal with the coming disappearance of jobs
b. How to create more jobs

3. True or false: In “Human Work in the Robotic Future,” McAfee and Brynjolfsson say policy makers’ top goal should be to protect full-time salaried jobs — the kind that gave rise to America’s large and prosperous middle class.

a. True
b. False

4. In “Human Work in the Robotic Future,” McAfee and Brynjolfsson say policy makers can increase jobs by

a. Reducing licensing requirements for certain occupations
b. Reducing barriers to entry for new firms that use new technology
c. Eliminating arbitrary distinctions between employees and independent contractors
d. All of the above

5. In “Human Work in the Robotic Future,” McAfee and Brynjolfsson advocate

a. A universal basic income
b. An increase in the Earned Income Tax Credit

HEALTH CARE

1. In the Sick Around the World video, T.R. Reid examines the health care systems of which countries?

a. United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, Taiwan, and Switzerland
b. Canada, Sweden, France, Australia, and South Korea

2. The chart below shows health spending as a share of GDP. According to the Sick Around the World video, the dark line is most likely which country?

a. United Kingdom
b. Japan
c. United States

3. According to the Sick Around the World video, in Germany and Switzerland most health care is paid for by private health insurance companies, just as in the United States. The main difference is that

a. In Germany and Switzerland, there is no competition between insurance companies
b. In Germany and Switzerland, the insurance companies aren’t allowed to make a profit on basic care

4. True or false: According to the Sick Around the World video, the upside of other rich nations’ health care systems is that everyone gets good care for free or low cost, while the downside in all of them is long waiting times for urgent medical procedures.

a. True
b. False

5. True or false: In all five countries examined in the Sick Around the World video, the hospitals are government-owned and all doctors are government employees.

a. True
b. False

ECONOMIC SECURITY

Not a quiz question: Which of the following would you guess American adults say is more important to them?

a. Financial stability
b. Moving up the income ladder

1. In High Wire, Peter Gosselin focuses on the story of Richard Coss Jr., who worked

a. in the financial industry in Pittsburgh
b. as CEO of a movie studio in Los Angeles

2. True or false: In High Wire, Peter Gosselin says the key problem facing many working- and middle-class Americans these days is that compared to a generation ago

a. They are poorer
b. They’ve fallen farther behind the top 1%
c. Their incomes are less stable

3. True or false: In High Wire, Peter Gosselin says a key reason why economic security has declined for many Americans is that America’s economic growth has slowed down a lot.

a. True
b. False

4. In High Wire, Peter Gosselin says the main way economic security has declined for many Americans is

a. They are more likely to lose their job or suffer a health problem or see their home damaged than in the past
b. If one of these things happens, the financial cost to them is greater than in the past

5. In High Wire, Peter Gosselin says a key contributor to declining economic security for Americans has been the scaling back of

a. Unemployment insurance
b. Guaranteed pensions
c. Affordable health insurance
d. All of the above

WEALTH INEQUALITY

Not a quiz question: Which would you guess is distributed more unequally in the US?

a. Income
b. Wealth

1. In “Why We’re in a New Gilded Age,” Paul Krugman says “the big story in rising inequality” is the gap between

a. The top 1% and the bottom 99%
b. Persons with a college degree and those without one

2. In “Why We’re in a New Gilded Age,” Paul Krugman says that evidence about the income and wealth of the rich comes mainly from

a. Surveys of households
b. Tax records

3. In “Why We’re in a New Gilded Age,” Paul Krugman describes the income share of the top 1% in the United States as

a. High in the early 20th century, then lower in the 1950s to 1970s, then high again since 1980
b. Low prior to 1980, high since then

4. In “Why We’re in a New Gilded Age,” Paul Krugman says the main source of soaring incomes for America’s top 1% is

a. Inheritance
b. Supersalaries

5. In “Why We’re in a New Gilded Age,” Paul Krugman says that Thomas Piketty, in Capital in the Twenty-First Century, believes an especially effective way to limit the rise of income and wealth inequality is via

a. Reductions in immigration
b. Progressive taxation

EDUCATION

1. In “Early Education,” I say that, on average, child care in the United States costs approximately

a. $1,000 a year
b. $10,000 a year

2. In “Early Education,” I say affordable high-quality childcare and preschool are likely to help

a. Increase employment by parents and reduce inequality of opportunity
b. Reduce inequality of income and wealth

3. True or false: In “Early Education,” I say one reason to suspect that early education will help to equalize opportunity is that K-12 schooling does so.

a. True
b. False

4. True or false: In “Early Education,” I say we should expand Head Start rather than create a universal early education system, because a universal program would be much more expensive and have few benefits.

a. True
b. False

5. In “Early Education,” I say universal high-quality early education for children age 12 months to kindergarten in the US would cost approximately

a. 1% of GDP
b. 10% of GDP

RELIGION

1. In “On Moralistic Therapeutic Deism,” Christian Smith says this is the most common approach to religion today among American

a. Teenagers
b. Older persons

2. In “On Moralistic Therapeutic Deism,” Christian Smith says that in this approach to religion the central aim of life is to

a. Do God’s will
b. Be happy and nice

3. In “On Moralistic Therapeutic Deism,” Christian Smith says that in this approach to religion, God is seen as

a. Directly intervening in our lives on a daily basis
b. Not often personally involved in our affairs

4. In “On Moralistic Therapeutic Deism,” Christian Smith says the popularity of this approach to religion suggests Americans are

a. Becoming less religious
b. Changing the emphasis of their religion

5. True or false: In “On Moralistic Therapeutic Deism,” Christian Smith says this approach to religion is popular only among Christians, not among Jews, Hindus, or Muslims.

a. True
b. False

INCLUSION: LGBTQs

1. True or false: Katie Couric’s video Gender Revolution says our genitalia doesn’t necessarily dictate the gender we identify as.

a. True
b. False

2. According to Katie Couric’s Gender Revolution, “intersex” babies, who have both female and male sex organs, are approximately

a. 1 out of every 2,000
b. 1 out of every 2 million

3. Katie Couric’s video Gender Revolution reports that over the past half century many “intersex” persons have been

a. Allowed to decide on their own which gender to identify as
b. Operated on shortly after birth to surgically impose a gender on them

4. According to Katie Couric’s Gender Revolution, a person whose gender identity is different from the one they were assigned at birth is

a. Cisgender
b. Transgender

5. True or false: In Gender Revolution, Katie Couric reports that one reason why some people are transgender is the amount of testosterone to which their brain is exposed during the second and third trimester of pregnancy.

a. True
b. False

INCLUSION: THE ELDERLY

1. In “The Loneliness of the Old Is a Very Modern Curse,” James Bartholomew argues that the optimal living arrangement for elderly persons is to

a. Continue to live in their own private homes and apartments
b. Move in with their children
c. Live in retirement homes and communities

2. True or false: In “The Loneliness of the Old Is a Very Modern Curse,” James Bartholomew says the worldwide trend has been toward the elderly living alone or in institutions, and that this has caused a big increase in unhappiness.

a. True
b. False

3. In “The Loneliness of the Old Is a Very Modern Curse,” James Bartholomew says the countries that most successfully promote happiness among the elderly are

a. The Netherlands and Denmark
b. Italy, Portugal, and Spain

4. The video King’s Point is mainly about which of the following issues in old age?

a. Financial insecurity
b. Loneliness

5. True or false: The video King’s Point suggests that retirement communities such as King’s Point solve the problem of loneliness for nearly all of their residents.

a. True
b. False

DEMOCRACY

1. Alex Gibney’s film, Park Avenue: Money, Power, and the American Dream, suggests that businesses and wealthy Americans get what they want in policy making by influencing

a. Republicans
b. Both Republicans and Democrats

2. In Park Avenue, Alex Gibney interviews a former lobbyist (Jack Abramoff) who says the reason lobbyists have a lot of influence over congresspersons and Senators is that the lobbyists

a. Have the resources needed to develop strong evidence-based arguments
b. Donate money to reelection campaigns

3. True or false: Several of the people interviewed in Park Avenue say part of lobbyists’ influence owes to the fact that they write bills containing what they want, which a legislator can then submit to the Senate or House of Representatives.

a. True
b. False

4. According to Park Avenue, what businesses and wealthy individuals have mainly sought to get from policy makers is

a. Improvements to our educational system
b. More support for the oil industry
c. Lower taxes

5. Toward the end, Park Avenue has a segment on Paul Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican who is now Speaker of the House. The film says Ryan favors

a. Tax cuts for the rich
b. Increases in spending on programs for the poor, such as Food Stamps and TANF
c. Both A and B

POLITICAL POLARIZATION

1. In their article “No, Americans Have Not Become More Ideologically Polarized,” Seth J. Hill and Chris Tausanovitch say polarization means

a. People’s views move away from the center toward the extremes
b. People dislike those on the other side more intensely

2. True or false: In their article “No, Americans Have Not Become More Ideologically Polarized,” Seth J. Hill and Chris Tausanovitch show that the voting records of US senators suggest they have moved away from the center toward the extremes.

a. True
b. False

3. True or false: In their article, Seth J. Hill and Chris Tausanovitch show that the American public hasn’t moved away from the center in its political views and policy preferences.

a. True
b. False

4. In their article “No, Americans Have Not Become More Ideologically Polarized,” Seth J. Hill and Chris Tausanovitch say that “party sorting” means

a. Conservatives have become more likely to be Republicans and liberals have become more likely to be Democrats
b. Democrats have become more conservative and Republicans have become more liberal

5. True or false: In their article “No, Americans Have Not Become More Ideologically Polarized,” Seth J. Hill and Chris Tausanovitch show that party sorting has occurred — conservatives have become more likely to be Republicans and liberals have become more likely to be Democrats.

a. True
b. False

GOVERNMENT 1

1. True or false: In his article on taxes, Gregory Mankiw says he strongly favors increasing the tax rate Americans pay.

a. True
b. False

2. In his article on taxes, Gregory Mankiw says his chief worry about higher taxes is that they will

a. Weaken civil society
b. Weaken our economy

3. In his article on taxes, Gregory Mankiw predicts that higher tax rates will reduce work effort by which of the following groups?

a. Those with high incomes
b. The middle class
c. The poor

4. Proponents of increasing taxes say that Americans with high incomes should contribute the most because they can afford to. Gregory Mankiw says he earns more than $250,000 a year …

a. but is barely making ends meet given Boston’s high cost of living
b. and can comfortably afford to pay more in taxes

5. In his article on how higher taxes may hurt the economy, Gregory Mankiw discusses which of the following pieces of evidence?

a. How America’s economic growth has varied in periods of lower versus higher taxes
b. How America’s economic growth has differed from that of other rich nations that have higher taxes
c. Neither A nor B

GOVERNMENT 2

1. In his article “Republicans Can’t Pass Bills,” David Brooks discusses two “flavors” of freedom:

a. Capacity and detachment
b. Familial and communitarian

2. True or false: In his article “Republicans Can’t Pass Bills,” David Brooks says that over the past 30 years Republicans’ major legislative achievements have aimed to increase Americans’ ability to take advantage of life’s opportunities.

a. True
b. False

3. In his article “Republicans Can’t Pass Bills,” David Brooks says that in recent decades Republicans “became, exclusively, the party of freedom as”

a. Capacity
b. Detachment

4. In his article “Republicans Can’t Pass Bills,” David Brooks says that if you’re a regular American, the main threat to your freedom is

a. Stuck-up Washington elites
b. Illness, family breakdown, social decay, technological disruption, and globalization

5. True or false: In his article “Republicans Can’t Pass Bills,” David Brooks says that Republican voters like the rhetoric of freedom as detachment, but the policies they want are about freedom as capacity.

a. True
b. False

SOCIAL CONNECTIONS

1. In “The Loneliness Scare,” Claude Fischer reports that compared to a generation ago, Americans in the 2000s

a. Eat fewer dinners with family or friends
b. Communicate more frequently with their relatives and friends
c. Both A and B

2. True or false: In “The Loneliness Scare,” Claude Fischer says the internet has been helpful for people who have trouble finding mates, such as older persons and gays.

a. True
b. False

3. True or false: In “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?,” Jean Twenge says that smartphones and social media have produced large increases in teen depression and suicide.

a. True
b. False

4. In “Yes, Smartphones Are Destroying a Generation, But Not of Kids,” Alexandra Samuel shows that according to data from the “Monitoring the Future” survey, unhappiness among 12th-graders

a. Increased sharply after 2012
b. Has been pretty unchanged since the late 1990s

5. True or false: In “Yes, Smartphones Are Destroying a Generation, But Not of Kids,” Alexandra Samuel shows that according to data from the “Monitoring the Future” survey, teenagers who use social media a lot are much more likely to say they’re unhappy

a. True
b. False

TRUST

1. In “In God We Trust, Maybe, but Not Each Other,” Connie Cass reports that the share of Americans who say “most people can be trusted” is approximately

a. One-third
b. Two-thirds

2. True or false: In “In God We Trust, Maybe, but Not Each Other,” Connie Cass says trust has declined in the US since the early 1970s.

a. True
b. False

3. True or false: In “In God We Trust, Maybe, but Not Each Other,” Connie Cass says trust boosts economic growth.

a. True
b. False

4. In “In God We Trust, Maybe, but Not Each Other,” Connie Cass says that hypotheses about why trust has declined in America include

a. Rising economic inequality
b. More TV watching and less participation in community groups
c. Increased greediness, lying, and cheating
d. All of the above

CLIMATE CHANGE

1. In An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore discusses a number of mistaken beliefs about climate change, including

a. Global warming is the result of normal, cyclical changes in the earth’s climate patterns
b. The earth is too large and too complex for human activity to affect the climate
c. Both A and B
d. Neither A nor B

2. In An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore says temperature measurements since 1850 indicate that many of the hottest years on record occurred

a. In the late 1800s
b. Between 1900 and 1920
c. Since 1990

3. In An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore discusses other evidence that climate change is occurring, including all of the following except

a. Wet regions getting wetter and dry regions drier
b. Increased melting of glaciers and the polar ice caps
c. California’s drought

4. According to An Inconvenient Truth, over the past 40 years the Arctic ice cap has

a. Shrunk significantly
b. Stayed the same
c. Increased significantly

5. In An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore

a. Says the cost of reducing carbon emissions would likely be less than 0.1% of GDP
b. Doesn’t provide an estimate of the cost